Course Descriptions

Saint Augustine of HippoFNA 8317 Examining Fine Arts: Great Ideas Readings – This course examines the history and philosophy of the nature the arts using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Aristotle’s Poetics, Augustine’s On Music, Goethe’s Poetry and Truth, Tolstoy’s What is Art?, Shaw’s Sanity of Art, Dewey’s Art as Experience, Adler’s Art and Prudence, Thiessen’s Theological Aesthetics: A Reader, and Scruton’s Beauty. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to degree plan; to book list.

HU 7310, 8310 Interdisciplinary Studies Seminar – This course consists of readings from a range of disciplines. Special attention is given to seeing connections and relationships between ideas, authors, and readings in this course. Interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary readers are used in this course. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to degree plan; to 7310 book list; to 8310 book list.

HU 7311 Introduction to Humane Letters and Learning – This course examines the history and philosophy of Humane learning using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Ecclesiastes, Hugh of St. Victor’s Didascalicon, Dante’s Paradiso, John of Salisbury’s Metalogicon, Bruni’s The Study of Literature, Guarino’s A Program of Teaching and Learning, Vico’s On Humanistic Education, and Barzun’s House of Intellect. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to degree plan; to book list.

HU 8326 Understanding Humane Letters: Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings – This course examines the history and philosophy of Humane Letters using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Job, Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics, Sophocles’s Oedipus the King and Antigone, Aeschylus’s Prometheus Bound, Virgil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov, Bradbury’s Dandelion Wine, and Wilbur’s Collected Poems. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to degree plan; to book list.

HY 8315 Historical Investigations: Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings – This course examines select historical works from a philosophical and historical perspective using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Old Testament (Joshua–Esther), Herodotus’s Histories, Thucydides’s History of the Peloponnesian War, Plutarch’s Lives, Tacitus’s Annals, Acts, Huizinga’s Waning of the Middle Ages, and Dawson’s Dynamics of World History. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to degree plan; to book list.

The Young Cicero ReadingLIT 7324 Literary Analysis: Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings – This course examines the history and philosophy of literary theory using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Psalms, Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Poetics, Cicero’s De Oratore, Quintilian’s Institutio Oratori, Horace’s Ars Poetica, Longinus’s On the Sublime, Augustine’s On Christian Teaching, Dante’s Literature in the Vernacular, Sidney’s Apology for Poetry, and Blamires’s History of Literary Criticism. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to degree plan; to book list.

NMS 8328 Mathematical and Scientific Reasoning: Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings – This course examines the history and philosophy of mathematical and scientific reasoning using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Plato’s Meno, Euclid’s Elements, Archimedes’s On the Equilibrium of Planes, Nicomachus’s Introduction to Arithmetic, Ptolemy’s Almagest, Kepler’s Epitome of Copernican Astronomy, Galileo’s Two New Sciences, Bacon’s Novum Organum, Newton’s Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, Huygens’s Treatise on Light, and Lavoisier’s Elements of Chemistry. Using weekly threaded discussions, biweekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to degree plan.

PHL 7313 Great Ideas Readings: Philosophical Inquiries – This course examines select philosophical works from a historical perspective using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Proverbs, Plato’s Apology, Xenophon’s Apology, Aurelius’s Meditations, Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy, Aquinas’s Summa Theologica, Heidegger’s What Is Philosophy?, Sarte’s Existentialism Is a Humanism, and Polanyi’s Personal Knowledge. Using threaded discussions, weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to degree plan; to book list.

Portrait of AristotleSSC 7319 Great Ideas Readings: Reflection on Social Scientific Thought – This course examines the history and philosophy of social thinking using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to: Proverbs, Plato’s Phaedo, Aristotle’s On the Soul, Plutarch’s Of Bashfulness, James’s Principles of Psychology, Freud’s A General Introduction to Psycho-analysis, Veblen’s Theory of the Leisure Class, Tawney’s Acquisitive Society, and Weber’s Essays in Sociology. Using weekly threaded discussions, biweekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to degree plan; to book list.

8312, 8313, 8314 Independent Tutorials (HU/HY/LIT/PHL) – This course is a focused study of an author, idea(s), problem, theme, specific topic, or historical era. The course will be designed between a student and tutor and will be approved by the Head of the College. Readings, intellectual goals, and research will be determined based on the student’s interests and course of study. The course can be taken four times (12 credit hrs. total) with different content. To top; to degree plan; to tutorial contract instructions (Scholarnet login required).

9301, 9302 Dissertation (HU/HY/LIT/PHL) – The doctoral dissertation is the pinnacle of this academic program in Humane letters and learning. The dissertation must demonstrate serious engagement with the Great Tradition, manifest a broad understanding of the curriculum, and also show some level of unique interaction of the authors, ideas, and readings studied in the program. To top; to degree plan; to dissertation manual (Scholarnet login required); to dissertation archive.