Course Descriptions

HU 5311 Introduction to Humane Letters and Learning – This course examines the history and philosophy of Humane learning using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Ecclesiastes, Hugh of St. Victor’s Didascalicon, Dante’s Paradiso, John of Salisbury’s Metalogicon, Bruni’s The Study of Literature, Guarino’s A Program of Teaching and Learning, Vico’s On Humanistic Education, and Barzun’s House of Intellect. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to offering schedule; to degree plan; to book list.

Portrait of AristotleHU 5326 Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings: Understanding Humane Letters – This course examines the history and philosophy of Humane Letters using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Job, Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics, Sophocles’s Oedipus the King and Antigone, Aeschylus’s Prometheus Bound, Virgil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov and Wilbur’s Collected Poems. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to offering schedule; to degree plan; to book list.

HY 5315 Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings: Historical Investigations – This course examines select historical works from a philosophical and historical perspective using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Old Testament (Joshua–Esther), Herodotus’s Histories, Thucydides’s The History of the Peloponnesian War, Plutarch’s Lives, Tacitus’s Annals, Acts, Huizinga’s Waning of the Middle Ages, and Dawson’s Dynamics of World History. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to offering schedule; to degree plan; to book list.

LIT 5324 Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings: Literary Analysis – This course examines the history and philosophy of literary theory using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Psalms, Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Poetics, Cicero’s De Oratore, Quintilian’s Institutio Oratori, Horace’s Ars Poetica, Longinus’s On the Sublime, Augustine’s On Christian Teaching, Dante’s Literature in the Vernacular, Sidney’s An Apology for Poetry, and Blamires’s A History of Literary Criticism. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to offering schedule; to degree plan; to book list.

PHL 5313 Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings: Philosophical Inquiries – This course examines select philosophical works from a historical perspective using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Proverbs, Plato’s Apology, Xenophon’s Apology, Aurelius’s Meditations, Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy, Aquinas’s Summa, Heidegger’s What is Philosophy?, and Polanyi’s Personal Knowledge. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to offering schedule; to degree plan; to book list.

G. K. ChestertonREL 5322 Great Ideas, Authors, and Writings: Exploring Religion – This course examines the history and philosophy of religious studies using primary texts in whole and excerpts. Readings may include, but not necessarily be limited to Genesis, Exodus, Plato’s Euthyphro, The Gospel of Matthew, Cicero’s On the Nature of the Gods, Augustine’s Confessions, Tertullian’s Apology, Anselm’s Cur Deus Homo?, Chesterton’s Orthodoxy, Dawson’s Enquires into Religion and Culture, and Lewis’s Mere Christianity. Using threaded discussions, bi-weekly conference calls, written posted assignments, and online peer collaborative projects the student will develop thinking, reading, and writing skills and a deeper understanding of this material. To top; to offering schedule; to degree plan; to book list.

5308, 5309, 5310, 5311 Independent Tutorials (HU/HY/LIT/PHL/REL) – This course is a focused study of an author, idea(s), problem, theme, specific topic, or historical era. The course will be designed between a student and tutor and will be approved by the Head of the Honors College. Readings, intellectual goals, and research will be determined based on the student’s interests and course of study. The course can be taken four times (12 credit hrs. total) with different content. To top; to offering schedule; to degree plan; to tutorial contract instructions (Scholarnet login required).

5312 Thesis (HU/HY/LIT/PHL/REL) – The Master thesis is the pinnacle of this academic program in Humane learning. The thesis must demonstrate serious engagement with the Great Tradition, manifest a broad understanding of the curriculum, and also show some level of unique interaction of the authors, ideas, and readings studied in the program. To top; to offering schedule; to degree plan; to thesis manual (Scholarnet login required); to thesis archive.